Monday September 26th 2016

Trusted Helpline
Help Available 24/7
1-888-882-1456
PRIVACY
GUARANTEED

How to leave an addict? (Let go!)

Do you love an addict? Is addiction destroying your relationship your family? Do you find yourself looking online to find out how to help an addict? Are you exhausted by the relationship? Are you finally starting to realize you have to let go?

Here, we explore some of the thinking behind why you stay with an addict. And we invite you to let go of the fear and to do something different. More from someone who has been there, with a section for you to share your questions or situation at the end.

Do you find yourself saying…

  • “I am scared that if I leave they will die or be homeless or kill themselves.”
  • “I am afraid that if I leave, they will get better and find someone else.”
  • “I am frightened of being alone.”
  • “I am petrified that I will never love anyone like I love the addict.”
  • “I am fearful of telling my friends and family how bad things really are.”

The one thing all of these statements have in common are the words: SCARED, AFRAID, FRIGHTENED, PETRIFIED, FEARFUL. These are all just different words for feelings of fear. It is difficult to think about letting go of someone when you have so many fears about leaving. But, moving on after a relationship with an addict may be just what you need.

Where does the fear come from?

There is seldom a person who is thinking about leaving an addict who does not feel a powerful and sometimes overwhelming sense of fear. If your love for someone consists of fear, you should look at the source of the fear. We all experience love and friendship, but if something is not right, there is someone else out there for you.

It is a healthy thought to know that life can go on beyond a relationship that has failed regardless of who is to blame. If you have a fear of leaving someone, especially when the situation is toxic, then you must turn the mirror on you and take a look. Check out these symptoms of a codependent marriage for a start.

Furthermore, the fear of letting go is usually blown out of proportion because of the dramatic nature of this type of relationship. The ups and downs of dealing with an active addict may put you in a cycle of elation and depression. This fear may be a symptom of a deeper problem engrained in experiences from the past and not so much the present. The fear itself may be unjustified in the present situation.

Trusted Helpline
Help Available 24/7
1-888-882-1456
PRIVACY GUARANTEED

Let go of the fear

Life will not end for you if you leave an addict. Life may only just begin again. Because addiction can beat you down, you can become used to an attitude of negativity. A lack of enthusiasm for life can become the norm. And even though you may look at addiction as a disease, you cannot blame yourself or hold yourself accountable for someone else’s conscious choices.

If the fear comes from a place where you think the addict may fall apart without you, then you should take a good look at that. You are not responsible for anyone else, especially if they are mistreating you. When you play the role of caretaker, the addict usually dictates how you exist. If you can look at your role in the relationship and what it means to you, why it keeps you from leaving, and why it holds you back, you may be able to see the situation through objective eyes. Gaining perspective usually alleviates the fear.

The underlying truth: You’ve got issues

My husband and I were together for twelve years and we had one child. He had cheated on me, lied to me about everything, used drugs in our home, disappeared, and was verbally and emotionally abusive and yet I could not let him go. I had to ask myself if this was a problem with him or with me. The one good thing about my husband’s addiction was that I learned a great deal about myself. I allowed this to go on for reasons that had little to do with him and more to do with me.
Q: What can you do if your loved one is an addict?

A: Let go!

It is naturally hard to let someone you love go, despite the situation. But what I learned through my fear was that I had insecurities and underlying unresolved issues from my past. I was using my husband’s drug addiction to deflect my own issues. My husband was hiding behind drugs and I was hiding behind them too. I was able to point the finger at what was wrong with him so I did not have to deal what was wrong with me.

Facing yourself starts the healing process

Once I started to delve deeper into my personal issues and uncover self-confidence, the fear lessened. In fact, over time, the fear went away and letting go became a lot easier. When I was no longer afraid to deal with my own troubles, I did not want to be in a relationship with someone who was still afraid to deal with theirs.

If your relationship with an addict is more than you can handle, you may be thinking it is time to leave. If you find yourself daydreaming about a new relationship with a partner who is not an addict, you may be ready to move on. But you don’t need to do it alone. Please share your story, questions, or comments in the section below.

Photo credit: FlashBuddy

Leave a Reply

58 Responses to “How to leave an addict? (Let go!)
Georgie
8:15 am May 9th, 2015

Hi. I’m so glad I’ve stumbled on this blog it’s almost an epiphany reading it. I’ve only been with my partner for 2 years. It started out fairly rocky and has spiralled out of control. I am a primary school teacher with an 8 year old son and I’m hitting rock bottom, feeling despair! My partner has a drink problem is depressed and will often go on coke binges, not going to work, sitting in his room (at his grandmas house) just getting off his face. I’ve tried every which way to deal with this and have never understood why I kept going back?? He would beg and plead and I was relived when he did because the fear of losing him was overwhelming. I caught my partner in bed with someone on Boxing Day and he has been mentally abusive on several occasions. This has now taken a step up . This week he hit me smashed up my apartment and said he was going to harm my family. As always he feels, ashamed, guilty and sorry. And as always I felel relived that he doesn’t want to leave?? My son must feel neglected by me we used to be so close, but my efforts have all been invested in my obsession with my partner. I feel extreme guilt for this. Reading your blog has opened a door to me and I will continue to read on for guidance and inspiration so I can build the courage to remove myself from a toxic and unhappy existence. Thank you

Amanda Andruzzi
7:05 pm May 11th, 2015

Georgie,
Thank you for sharing with us. You are in the right place. What is happening to you is not unfamiliar to me. I have been through this and things seem to be turning uglier by the minute. You are caught in a cycle and if you want to get out of it, you will have to be the one to let go. You already realize what an unhealthy situation this is, but it is your son who is probably really hurting. When I left, I did it in the beginning for my daughter but in doing that I helped myself.
There is no other way to describe the pain you are going through other than hearing it from another person who has been there. I would recommend reading more of my articles here, especially, Co-Addiction: Get Angry. (click on my name Amanda Andruzzi, at the top near my picture and all of my articles will come up). You need to start looking at the reasons you would stay in such a relationship because if you stay then you have to take responsibility for why this is happening. You realize he is not changing, and if you looked at this from an outsider’s perspective, you know you would have to leave. The question is why don’t you?
I had the same dilemma and it took me 12 long years to figure out why and get out of it. Hope Street is a memoir of my last year living with an addict. It is an eye opening, intense journey that really puts everything out there. I do not hold back and it may be helpful for you.
If you want to leave, the first step is knowing, the next is taking an action, however small and moving in that direction.
Keep me posted.
Amanda Andruzzi, published author, Hope Street, a memoir from a co-addict

Kitrina
11:49 pm May 20th, 2015

My daughter has been an addict for 7 years I am raising her chikdren I constantly worry and blame myself I want to let go but don’t know how

Amanda Andruzzi
3:06 pm May 21st, 2015

Kitrina,

There is nothing easy about Letting Go of a child. I don’t know all that you have done for her but raising Her children is a pretty big deal. You do not have to stop the love but for her best interest, yours and the children you can detach with love. Know that by letting go of a relationship with the addict is only saying you will not tolerate her addiction any longer. You can let her know you will always love her and be there to support her if ever she is ready to recover. As you have probably already learned there is nothing you can do to sto her but you can send her a message; that you won’t enable her addiction any longer. It may sound cruel but if she can she will never stop using if she has someone that picks up the pieces for her. If you identify how you may enable her addiction, you can stop those things and love her from a distance. I am sure her children need your full attention now more than ever and God Bless you for caring for them. They are lucky you are there for them. I would visit your local al-anon group, with children I believe it is a great resource on how to handle the emotions of loving an addict. You need support from others who have been there and it is out there, unfortunately. This happens more often than you could imagine. Most importantly take care of yourself and those children and you may have to let your daughter hit her rock bottom. I would keep reading the articles I have written, click on Amanda Andruzzi, they will all come up. Read “Zero Tolerance for Addiction:help for families” and the many others that will support you. Keep me posted, I hope this was helpful. My thoughts are with your family.
Amanda Amdruzzi, published author, Hope Street, a memoir from the wife of an addict

Georgia
1:45 pm May 23rd, 2015

Many women do not have the earning power to leave the alcoholic. My husband functions enough to still work and bring in a paycheck. That is my fear.

Amanda Andruzzi
12:57 am May 27th, 2015

Georgia,
Although that is a valid fear, I agree, there are ways to supplement. If he brings in a paycheck, you will be able to have him pay your for possible spousal support and child support, it will be deducted directly from his check if it gets to that. You can enlist support of friends and family to help with children while you find a job that can help you earn more money or try to work while the kids are in school. There are ways, it can be done, I did it and I never thought I could. If you fear that you will not be able to find a job, then while you are living with him, look for one and/or start training for something you can do when you leave, either online courses from home or training for a practical career. You will have his support, if there are children involved and you may have to scale back on living expenses or housing until you can earn more yourself but don’t make that fear stop you.
Amanda Andruzzi, published author, Hope Street, a memoir from the wife of an addict
view the video trailer: http://sbprabooks.com/amandaandruzzi/video/

Sara
9:35 am May 30th, 2015

Hi, I have been with my boyfriend for about two years now. About a year ago I caught him smoking meth. He confided that it was something he did every once and a while and I freaked. He promised it would not be a part of our life. Now with in six months his usage appeared again and this time it started to become more frequent. Enough to were I noticed and on a few different occasions. He lied straight to my face on a number of times, although he always came clean. I tried being the understanding girlfriend, and the nagging up set one. Now on the last month he has used five times. My roommate is this low life math addict that is his old high school friend. When my bf and I first met he made himself out to be some kind of martyr, telling me and all my friends how he brought his friend to town to get him away from meth, and the entire time he was using. This same lowlife roommate is the man that brings the drugs into my home. My bf has made me feel crazy, mentally and emotionally broken me to pieces and I can’t seem to let him go. I keep rationalizing his behavior, telling myself that he will get bette, or I was a nag so I deserved it, or that he isn’t an addict just a user and it hasn’t gotten in the way of his life. But it has, or I wouldn’t be here writing this. I feel like I am now crazy, and can’t even trust myself. I read too deep into everything and feel as if I trust no one. I am sad and don’t know how to let go.

Amanda Andruzzi
1:03 pm June 3rd, 2015

Sara,
You are not crazy. Addicts have to make you feel that way so they can go on using. You need to start trusting yourself and your gut feelings. I can assure you, your boyfriend is an addict. He needs help but you cannot make him get help and it does not sound like he wants help. Addiction starts much like you describe with him and I am almost positive you will eventually uncover he is using even more than you can prove he is. Please keep reading about addiction and co-addiction here, click on my name Amanda Andruzzi and my 30 plus articles will come up. they are a great resource for you to stop the madness and start dealing with what is really going on. My book, Hope Street, is about my time with an addict and it is a very real and raw depiction of my feelings of loving an addict. I felt crazy on a daily basis trying to sort out what was actually going on, but there is hope. There is hope for you and that is what the book is really about. Keep posting, I am here to help.
Amanda Andruzzi, published author, Hope Street, a memoir from the wife of an addict
view the video trailer: http://sbprabooks.com/amandaandruzzi/video/

Ellen
3:44 pm June 4th, 2015

Hi Amanda,
I got Hope Street after reading this blog and I was feeling better when I was reading it…. This was about a while ago, when I kicked my cocaine/heroin addict boyfriend out of my place after finding out that he pawned thousand of dollars worth of my jewelry, I thought that was my breaking point, so I kicked him out, changed my phone number and was feeling pretty confident that this time it was for good.
I was wrong :(
I have to said I have enabled him practically since we got together about a year ago.
His only income is a monthly social security check due to mental disability (bipolar).
I took him in my place, bailed him out of jail, paid fines, paid for a lawyer, paid for suboxone and basically gave him everything he needed, because silly codependent me, thought I was going to be able to “save” him.
Big mistake, I can not save anyone. Only me.
After I kicked him out, he ended up in the hospital (that is what he does when he does not have where to go) and after leaving the hospital he went to live in an halfway house. After weeks of ignoring him, I gave in and finally talked to him.
We ended up spending the weekend together and he was back and full of promises.
I was happy/mad at myself/kind of hopeful?
So three weeks after getting back together, yesterday, I found out he stole my ATM card, got drugs, packed everything up, got a bus ticket to go to Florida and told me he was sorry for everything he did to me, he did not deserved me and he was leaving the keys. I was more than ok with it.
I came back home after work, and I found him unconscious in my living room. He overdosed. He is in the hospital, I could not go to the hospital last night I was way too upset and shocked after what I experienced. He called me a couple of times in the middle of the night begging me to go to the hospital. All I know is he has pneumonia.
I do not want to be with him. His family is sick of it and wont really help at all. I feel terrible he almost die yesterday and just turning my back on him seems so cruel. But again, he is a drug addict, he is the king of manipulation.
Should I visit him in the hospital and tell him is over between us?

Amanda Andruzzi
4:34 pm June 9th, 2015

Ellen,
What do you feel you will accomplish by letting him back in? Do you think he will change?
This all depends on how long you want to put up with an addict, if you want to subject yourself to his addiction then visit him. But if you want to be happy and have a chance at a real life with someone I would say walk away and continue to work on yourself. You fell back into it but you can still walk away. Try a support group in your area or anything that will keep up your strength so you do not fall back into old patterns. You cannot be in a relationship with an addict, the drugs are first.
Amanda Andruzzi,

Jennifer
4:21 am June 10th, 2015

Amanda thank you so much for telling me about Hope Street! I read it and felt like I was reading my own life story! This has really opened my eyes!!

Amanda Andruzzi
6:43 pm June 11th, 2015

Jennifer,

Thank you for the feedback. I am so glad the book helped you, that is the number one reason I wrote it.
Amanda Andruzzi

Kate
8:18 pm June 12th, 2015

I’m with an ex heroin addict. He has improved so much and has gotten naltrexone implants but he is now drinking every day and using speed. I feel guilty for thinking of leaving because it’s very perfect when he is sober but I realise that that’s only some of the time. Other times it’s hell and I even get so angry I slap or hit him and I am not normally an angry person. I am so afraid of who I am turning into. But I am overwhelmed with the thought of moving all of my stuff out of this house and scared to admit defeat to the people who doubted us. I’m so sad because heis improving everyday but I don’t know if it’s enough. I need a support network but I don’t want to deal with the judgement and embarrassment of talking to friends. I’m so sad and overwhelmed :(

Mike
7:26 pm June 14th, 2015

If you are not married, run the heck away from this person as fast as you can. They will ruin your life 100%. You aren’t different or special. Your life will the a living hell. If my time machine wasn’t broken, I’d go back to the day I met my wife and sleep in.

Amanda Andruzzi
7:28 pm June 24th, 2015

Kate,
This is a time for you to get some support to learn what you are dealing with and what you are going through. You may want to find a group, al-anon or local support group and/or personal therapist who specializes in addiction to help you understand your part in this. The key is to understand that this is not the life you want and that you are going to have to make the necessary changes to help yourself. What you are feeling is normal and you are not alone. I have been where you are and it is a very frustrating position, you are caught between the love you have for this amazing person you see in glimpses and the hatred and/or pity you have for the addict.
I wrote my book Hope Street to help people like you, who were just like me. I hope you get to read it. Keep me posted. I am here to help.
Amanda Andruzzi, published author, Hope Street, a memoir from the wife of an addict
View the Video BOOK Trailer: http://sbprabooks.com/amandaandruzzi/video/

Amanda Andruzzi
7:30 pm June 24th, 2015

Mike,
I understand your comment completely. I bet most of us here would feel the same way. If you become involved with an addict, your life will be turned upside down and you will become a person you don’t even recognize anymore. That is the whole point to this site. I want to help people see that they need to make a change and extricate themselves from a toxic situation. The only power you have is the power to change yourself.
Amanda Andruzzi, published author, Hope Street, a memoir from the wife of an addict
View the Video BOOK Trailer: http://sbprabooks.com/amandaandruzzi/video/

Jewell
11:26 pm July 1st, 2015

Thank you for the insite. I have been with my husband for 12 years. From year 6-10 he was heavily addicted to prescription drugs. I detached and stayed and he got through it. On his own and I was so proud. He then sought mental health treatment And as diagnosed bipolar. I have recently fount out the past 5 months he has been addicted to meth. I had a feeling he was doing it during the latter of this period but in no way had an idea of how out of control it was. I feel pushed by this farther than 5 years of rx abuse (including 3 totaled cars, numerous accidents and lawsuits). During this whole period my guy told me something was wrong I just never fathomed this. I have stopped paying my mtg this month so I am able to save up enough to move me and our children out. Although I have made this decision I second guess it and am overly depressed and neglecting my duties as a mommy to be the best I can. I don’t know what to do or how I m going to do it

momof4
10:15 pm July 7th, 2015

Hello, I posted on another one of your articles not too long ago regarding my husband who is a crack addict. Long story short again, married 5 years and things seem to be getting worse. His wedding ring is at the pawn shop, he missed his daughters birthday party recently, and has sold many of his items to get his fix. We’ve tried over and over to come up with a solution to this and nothing changes. Every time he gets paid, he gets upset that I ask him for money, and ends up overdrawing his account ny hundreds of dollars. A week ago I finally had the courage to kick him out. I packed his stuff and his staying with his mom. My problem is now he is texting/calling/begging that he needs me ans cant live without me. We have 2 daughters together, so of course I always will have contact. But WHY WHY WHY am I finding myself falling for this again!!!! He missed rhe holiday with us because I told him he wasn’t welcome, yet part of me feels guilty. What is wrong with me! Why can’t I just cut ties and move,on! Is there a chance this time he will change?! Its been a week… And he claims he will get help and hasn’t gotten into anything yet… Only calls. Please, I need a push to stand strong… Why do I keep allowing this??

Amanda Andruzzi
6:20 pm July 9th, 2015

Jewel, please pick up my book Hope Street, it is my memoir of my life married to an addict.it may really help you feel less alone, understood, and give you hope. You are doing the right thing, you need to focus on you and your children right now and leave him alone with his addiction. Youcannot change anyone else or fix their addiction for them. You need to find some support for you and learn more about enabling. Please read my other articles here, click on my name at the top and the rest will come up. They will help you understand that you are not alone and that there is help and hope.please keep me posted I am here to help.
Amanda Andruzzi, published author, Hope Street, a memoir from the wife of an addict View the Video BOOK Trailer: http://sbprabooks.com/amandaandruzzi/video/

Amanda Andruzzi
6:25 pm July 9th, 2015

Mom of four, please give yourself some time to heal and stay away from this situation so you can allow yourself to Move On and Let Go. It is going to be very hard to leave someone you love but actions speak louder than words and his actions speak volumes. If he is not getting clean Those are empty promises and you need to look at what he’s doing and not what he saying. You know what will happen if you take him back and none of this is rational so now it is time to use your headand ignore your heart so that you can get help for yourself and focus on helping your children they need you right now and you need them. I have been where you are married to an addict and I know firsthand this is not easy but it can be done.
Amanda Andruzzi, published author, Hope Street, a memoir from the wife of an addict View the Video BOOK Trailer: http://sbprabooks.com/amandaandruzzi/video/

Daniel
12:13 pm July 24th, 2015

I was with a girl throughout a;; of high school and 2 years after. We are 20 years old now and she went on a trail of drug use and ended up with a strong addiction to heroin. After 6 long lost years of a sad relationship I am finally back on track to getting my life together and have never felt better letting go and experiencing a freedom and happiness I haven’t felt in years.

Laura
8:23 am August 3rd, 2015

I have a child with my boyfriend of four years. He is an addict who uses mostly cocaine i think, but meth sometimes, and possibly other stuff, idk! It has been rocky from the beginning with him. I met him right when i filed for divorce after 14 years of marriage n three kids, so i was in a vulnerable place. I had no knowledge of drugs or addictions n had no idea he was an addict until i got pregnant. He had no kids n wanted one so badly, but right away things got ugly. He would occasionally stay out all night after small arguments and i was just crushed. Three times i kicked him out of my house when his drug use got really out of hand. Each time it was like he just exited his real life. Didnt work much or pay bills, just existed, wandered and kept an eye on me. Then we would get back together n he would do much better. This time he has been out of the house for two months after a domestic with me. Since then he began a treatment program but it is only once a week and he has only been going for two weeks. Im sure he is still using because he is completely paranoid and delusional about several things like me cheating, having guys over, and people following him and monitoring his phone, etc. He is also not working or supporting our chid and just smashed his car which he makes payments for but is in my name and under my insurance. I dont wanna give up on him, but aside from him going to treatment and occasional n.a. meetings, i dont see any reason to hope. He wont take an at home drug test for me and i dont let him take our two year old anywhere. I keep telling him to quit texting, calling, n stopping by til he will pass a drug test but he keeps weaseling back into my life….advice anyone?

Laura
8:37 am August 3rd, 2015

Georgie, you sound so much like me! I have also found that I have put my addict boyfriend ahead of my kids, and they havent deserved that. I am also a teacher, and i feel this is a difficult situation for me because i always have hope in people to change and dont like to give up on people…Anyway, for your and your child’s sake I hope u had the courage to leave this guy.

Amanda Andruzzi
3:02 am August 7th, 2015

Laura,
You will get to a point where you are done with this. It is sad but that time will only come when you are ready to focus on you, your children and let him live out his addiction. I am glad he is gone and I hope you are able to move on.
Amanda Andruzzi, published author, Hope Street, a memoir from the wife of an addict
View the Video BOOK Trailer: http://sbprabooks.com/amandaandruzzi/video/

Marie
2:02 pm August 8th, 2015

Wow!! I am so glad I came across these articles. It is my story in so many ways. The fear of leaving is crippling. I have decided to do it even though I am petrified. It seems to be getting easier even though i am still scared. Thank you so much. I realize that i am not crazy. I was so focused on my husband problem that i neglected our daughter and she ended with a guy who was emotionally, physically and verbally abusive to her. Just like her dad was emotionally and verbally abusive to me. I get confused because I know he loves us but he needs to realize he has a problem and get help. I feel and have felt so guilty about this especially i felt like i neglected her when her brother, my son died. Its like his death did so many things to me and i know i don’t want to live with a drug user any more. I thank God for leading me to your articles.

Amanda Andruzzi
2:12 am August 10th, 2015

Daniel,
I am so happy for you. That is what we are talking about here, freedom from another’s addiction. Just because they cannot get out from under the addiction does not mean you should suffer along with them. Thank you for sharing this with us.
Amanda Andruzzi, published author, Hope Street, a memoir from the wife of an addict
View the Video BOOK Trailer: http://sbprabooks.com/amandaandruzzi/video/

Angela
9:17 pm August 16th, 2015

My bf has decided to go to treatment… He is a crack addict that uses alcohol to keep level in between binges. he has been clean for almost 2 weeks. He has been staying with me, I thought I was strong enough to support him through this time, but I am not. I asked him to leave this morning. He is gone. He is so angry with me because I told my people ( that have watched how his addiction has affected my life) about his choice to get help.
Over the last week of us trying to be together without him using, he has become totally withdrawn, hiding in my bedroom, sleeping, he won’t talk to me, or look at me, or touch me… He doesn’t want to see any of my family or friends. Which is so uncomfortable for me. This morning I told him I feel as though he needs to focus on his recovery not our relationship, and that I can’t keep giving and nurturing him, without anything in return.
He is gone. I am so sad. I truly want him to get better, but am confused because I feel like I had more connection with him when he was using… Now that he isn’t he is impossible to be around. I was in love with addict ? I asked him if he wanted me to come to meetings with him, when he replied no, I told him if I can’t be apart of his recovery there probably is no place for me in his life. He left, saying that he can’t trust that I won’t go telling “everyone ” about his progress, and that this is his problem, not mine… He doesn’t see that he has made it my problem, I talk about my problems with friends and loved ones it helps me. I feel like I’ve done something wrong.
I’m not to sure exactly what I expect from sharing this, I just needed some input from others that have dealt with situations similar.
It is best that I let him go ? I just want to know he is ok, is it wrong for me to feel as though I deserve to know how he is doing throughout his journey ? Is it wrong that I want so badly to be someone he can count on, even just as a friend ? Is it wrong that because of what happened in our relationship that led to him going for treatment that I feel I deserve to be informed on his progress? I am so hurt and confused.

Amanda Andruzzi
1:07 am August 31st, 2015

Angela,
This is a hurtful process but know that he has just stopped using drugs and 2 weeks is rough period for anyone or their brain to adjust to sobriety. He is in no place to maintain or fix a broken relationship right now so I think you made the right choice. We want so much from addicts but the demons they face on and off drugs can consume them and having a relationship is sometimes an added stress so do not take this personally. At two years of clean living you would have a better picture of his sobriety being a life choice that will last. Do you have the right to know what is going on with him? NO, if he does not want you to know and YES if he does but what is best for the both of you right now is to recover, him from his addiction and you from being hurt and torn apart by another’s addiction. I would focus on some counseling, reading, support groups and keep talking it out with those you trust and love.
Amanda Andruzzi, published author, Hope Street, a memoir from the wife of an addict
View the Video BOOK Trailer: http://sbprabooks.com/amandaandruzzi/video/

Tiffany
4:34 pm September 7th, 2015

Hi Amanda,

Your articles are amazing and I cannot wait to read your book. I have just left an addict but am questioning if I should tell him it is because he is an addict? He manipulated an altercation and probably thinks I’m just upset because of that but the sad reality is he is an addict and I don’t think he sees himself as one because he surrounds himself with people who do way more drugs.

Thank you!!

Amanda Andruzzi
6:10 pm September 7th, 2015

Tiffany,
You owe no explanation. As long as you realize that he has a problem and you don’t want to be involved with this situation any more that is a good step. I say keep on walking. My book will give you a good glimpse I to the future of you stay.
Amanda Andruzzi, published author, Hope Street, a memoir from the wife of an addict View the Video BOOK Trailer: http://sbprabooks.com/amandaandruzzi/video/

Jeremy
1:21 pm September 27th, 2015

After seven years I’ve lost the love of my life. We have one son together and she was great stepmom to my older three which I have custody have. For first 5 years she was most amazing woman to me, our son, and my boys. But 2 years ago her family got her started on weed and pills and knowing I wouldn’t accept this she left. Now she says she happy at her moms because she can do whatever she likes. Its hard to accept this once amazing woman who loved me and my boys so much chose this path of drugs. I can’t way or sleep. I feel sick all time and for what. I didnt choose this.

Cathy
4:07 am October 9th, 2015

I was married for 15 years when I found out my husband was using meth and had cheated on me with a stripper from Las Vegas. I was lost and heartbroken. I had been with him since I was 17 years old and we had two kids together. I felt totally lost and tried to figure out what happened that made him make the choices he made. He had struggled with alcohol in the past but had quit drinking for 14 years, so when all this happened I was at a loss I didn’t know what to do. He ended up leaving me and my girls for the stripper and didn’t really keep in touch with his kids at all during this time. I divorced him after he left and then about 2 years later he called me and was desperate so I like an idiot helped him out financially. Well he ended up getting thrown in jail in Vegas and got cleaned up and we started talking again and because apparently I’m stupid I gave him another chance and another 8 years of my life. Well come to find out he started using meth again so when I caught him I kicked him out of the house. I feel like such a fool and I don’t understand how he could do this to me again. He is currently back with the same stripper that he left me for 10 years ago, I know I did the right thing by kicking him out but I always wonder how someone can lie and be so deceitful to someone that the profess they love. I gave him so much of my life and I wonder if I’m ever going to find someone that will love me and treat me the way I deserve to be treated or am I going to be alone for the rest of my life? I’m broken-hearted and I’m tired of being hurt I can’t believe someone would do this to someone they supposedly love not only once but twice in a lifetime.

Melissa
5:46 pm October 14th, 2015

I am so glad to have found your blog. I have been married to my husband for 14 years and we have two beautiful children together. Four years ago he went away to an inpatient facility for heroin/opiate addiction. I struggled to let go of the anger and pain when he came home but we continued to try and move forward. He stayed home for three years and I think I resented the fact that I felt like he wasn’t contributing to the family…this, of course, built up more anger. About 6 months ago, he began drinking and using again. Things got really bad; the lies, the stealing, the manipulation…it took me right back to where I had been years earlier but I refused to let myself go there. I was numb to the pain this time…just angry. We talked about separation and even divorce and both agreed that would happen. Well, he’s now been 5 days sober and has come out of his fog and now thinks we need to fight for us and for our family. It’s hard to now see the person I do love and tell him I don’t think I can do that. I just don’t think I have that fight left in me. I don’t know how to let go of the fear and the anger and the pain. I am feeling so lost and tired. I just want a simple solution and there isn’t one. My gut tells me to continue moving forward with the split but he’s doing a good job of convinving me that I’d just be giving up on our family. I think in my head I’ve committed to a life without him but saying it outloud and making it official on paper is so terrifying.

Amanda Andruzzi
8:26 pm October 19th, 2015

Jeremy, Cathy and Melissa,
You have all been seriously hurt by the person you love, probably numerous times. There is no right or easy answer and I think you know that. However, when a person chooses drugs, they are not choosing you and your relationship. It is a hard realization to come to but you have to make a choice; stay in the past and go through all of the mistrust and lies over and over again trying to figure out what went wrong or move on and get your life back. Addiction can suck the life out of you and keep you in a very sad place for as long as you will let it. It is a process and getting over someone does not happen overnight, moving on can be a journey but either way you make a choice to do that and usually you know in your gut it is the right choice.
If you stay, what do you feel is in store for you and are you willing to keep going in the same cycle? You cannot trust an addict’s words but only their actions and if they are not in active recovery every single day, then they are just on their way back to their addiction at some point.
Amanda Andruzzi, published author, Hope Street, a memoir from the wife of an addict View the Video BOOK Trailer: http://sbprabooks.com/amandaandruzzi/video/

Cathy
12:23 am October 26th, 2015

Thank you for your response. I know I need to move on and if I don’t I will be stuck living the same life that I was living with all the lies and mistrust. This blog has helped me so much to know that there are others that are dealing with the same issues I am. Thanks again for your response!!!

Amanda Andruzzi
1:53 am October 27th, 2015

Cathy,
It does get better. I promise you that. You just need distance, time and some self-love. Keep reading the other articles here, I have written many for coping skills and inspiration.
Amanda Andruzzi, published author, Hope Street, a memoir from the wife of an addict View the Video BOOK Trailer: http://sbprabooks.com/amandaandruzzi/video/

Nicole
11:51 pm November 5th, 2015

I am a opiad addict.I had my first surgery at 11 then 4 more after by the age of 15 I was a full blown addict.The last year in a half I lost my medical an started snorting herion.I always worked cooked cleaned an took care of my son.I had a really bad childhood an now have bad depression an PTSD I never went into a rehab until recently.I have been married to a abusive cheating husband for 14 years as of today I have been clean 42 days I also have endometriosis an a disc in my lower back an I take nothing.My only reason for sharing is to say this is the hardest thing I have ever done in my whole life.I also have my sisters two kids along with my son because she is still using but my only point is that it is possible to change I know I will always be Nicole a opiad addict but that doesn’t mean I will go back to using if you want it bad enough you will do it but a addict will not change for a spouse I did it for my kid to be very honest but now I am doing it for my 3 kids an my self but my number one motivation was my son he didn’t ask to be here.My mother was a addict my whole life she wasn’t really a mother my father did of a accidental over dose at 41 you think that would of stopped me

Amanda Andruzzi
3:37 pm November 12th, 2015

Nicole,
Thank you for sharing that and giving us a glimpse of the other side of the story. It sounds like you were a victim of drugs growing up and it was all you knew. If your parents were addicts, sister and you watched your father die, then it was very likely that you would do the only thing you knew to cope with life. I have never had addiction but I have experienced clinical depression and PTSD and it is hard to breathe, never mind function. There are a lot of options of non-narcotic antidepressants that can really help you along with therapy, mediation, exercise, and learning coping skills that can help you live a happy life. Drugs, as you know, are a band-aid to a much deeper issue and I hope you pull through. You are an addict but you are also a co-addict and this has been a way of life for you, I am glad you are in recovery and realize it does not have to be.
Amanda Andruzzi, published author, Hope Street, a memoir from the wife of an addict
View the Video BOOK Trailer: http://sbprabooks.com/amandaandruzzi/video/

Tricia
6:09 am December 5th, 2015

I’m really happy to have stumbled across your writing here. I had quite a shock of finding my husband of 13 years hiding a backpack full of empty whiskey bottles in our neighbors recycling bin- 14 hrs later he had the shakes so bad I forced him to go to the ER. I knew he drank beer, but I had no idea he was this bad off. I packed him a bag and sent him off to detox, went to my one and only Al alanon meeting (it was not for me, but was a great motivator to not be a person like some of the women I met in the group with major addiction cycles in their and their family life) and then would not let him back into the house when he was released from detox. From there I rented our house to save our mortgage and moved out, while he found a place to live in a sober living recovery home. I finally have started letting him see our daughter, and picking her up from school again 2 days a week (he says hes on antabuse). My biggest problem is that I KNOW I did the right thing making him leave. I KNOW that it saved his life. I KNOW we are going to be better off once we get out of my parents basement. However Im struggling with guilt for not taking him back due to the fact that he is in recovery, and seems to be doing well. I have been taking stock of our entire relationship and I just do not think I can do it… I do not think I want to be in a relationship with a recovered alcoholic, because is an alcoholic ever truly recovered? I don’t think they are. Why do I feel like the bad guy here? I feel like I keep getting told I contributed to the alcoholism (which I understand- I enabeled and kept peace in my own way, and kept it a secret even from myself ), but kicking him out immediately is a perfectly acceptable response right? Why do I need to go thru the whole abused spouse/ mourning thing / yo yo relapse riga-ma-rol when I know the relationship is (should be) over? I understand my sadness and grief. I do not understand my intense guilt for empowering myself to make the right decision. Any tips to help me deal with the guilt?

Rj
8:41 pm December 15th, 2015

I myself have been involved with an addict. I am a fairly successful woman who prides herself about not needing anyone to take care of me…until he came along. I knew he was a recovering addict when I met him but he hadnt used in a year. He also said he suffers from BPD…before I met him I had a breakup with the man I thought was the man of my life. So needless to say when he broke up with me I was in the lowest state of mind. So when I met my current he at first made me feel really special, like I was the best thing in the world. And then it just spiraled. The demands that were placed on me emotionally are so draining and I feel like I am going crazy. I am finally at the point where I’m ready to end it. I have been here see real times but FEAR was so crippling. And I always ran back…he has had a couple of bouts of rehab. And now he accuses me of nit being there for him when he needs me most. I have done things for this man that I would have never done. I have dealt with rescuing him from suicidal attempts, to babysitting him making sure that he doesn’t feel lonely and end up drinking. He’s rehabing again and I can’t do this anymore and I feel guilty like I’m abandoning him. I think we’ll just get him through this and leave..but I know where that leads because when he’s clean and sober I feel like maybe he can have a normal relationship when deep inside I wait until the next drunken episode

Amanda Andruzzi
11:00 pm December 15th, 2015

Tricia,
You DID do the right thing? You made a decision to save yourself and your children from a situation so many of us stay in for far too long. I hope you do not continue to beat yourself up about leaving and if you feel you cannot be with this man, then you cannot. Your guilt is part of the process and so is the sadness. It will fade over time but you have to give yourself a chance to heal and work through the emotions. If you have read my book/articles you will see that I respect Al-anon but I couldn’t accept living alongside an addict, I wanted more and so I sought other outlets. Try therapy, cognitive behavior therapy, EMDR, hypnosis, or anything that can help you sort through these emotions which will persist if you ignore them. Letting go is a process and it takes time. You will be okay.
Tara,
You love an addict and you enable him, that makes you a co-addict like many of us here. He is addicted to his drug and you are addicted to him, his lies and false promises. The best way to get over an addiction is to get it out of your system and go through your own healling process and recovery. You know now that he won’t change so you need to. Please read the other articles I have here in this blog to help you do that but you need to admit that you need to move on first and comitt to doing that. It will be hard and then it will get easier so make sure you have lots of support. Tell friends what you are doing, seek a therapist that specializes in addiction or co-dependency, find a support group like al-anon and focus on your issues, not his. He does something for you that you are addicted to, highs and lows, drama, promises and you deserve a real life, not an intermittent ray of short-lived happiness. When you realize that, you can’t go back.
Amanda Andruzzi, published author, Hope Street, a memoir from the wife of an addict
View the Video BOOK Trailer: http://sbprabooks.com/amandaandruzzi/video/

Amanda Andruzzi
11:02 pm December 15th, 2015

Tricia,
You DID do the right thing? You made a decision to save yourself and your children from a situation so many of us stay in for far too long. I hope you do not continue to beat yourself up about leaving and if you feel you cannot be with this man, then you cannot. Your guilt is part of the process and so is the sadness. It will fade over time but you have to give yourself a chance to heal and work through the emotions. If you have read my book/articles you will see that I respect Al-anon but I couldn’t accept living alongside an addict, I wanted more and so I sought other outlets. Try therapy, cognitive behavior therapy, EMDR, hypnosis, or anything that can help you sort through these emotions which will persist if you ignore them. Letting go is a process and it takes time. You will be okay.

Amanda Andruzzi, published author, Hope Street, a memoir from the wife of an addict
View the Video BOOK Trailer: http://sbprabooks.com/amandaandruzzi/video/

Amanda Andruzzi
11:07 pm December 15th, 2015

Rj,
Welcome to the cycle of co-addiction. It is a very stressful and sad place to be and racked with guilt and hope we keep attempting to do the same thing and expect different results. If you keep taking him back, why should he stop? He will continue to appease you with his attempts of detox but he is not doing it for him and if he does not do it because he feels he is ready for recovery then that is why it is not working. You should not feel guilty for leaving, he is making you feel guilty but it is not your responsibility to take care of him this way. He makes a choice after he is in detox and that choice is to not follow through with recovery but to use again, he is a grown man and you should not have to suffer in a relationship with someone who is making your life hell on earth. I did it for 12 years and when I finally left over 5 years ago, last I heard, he continues to use drugs. I know I made the right choice because my gut told me that he was not ready to recover. What does your gut tell you?
Amanda Andruzzi, published author, Hope Street, a memoir from the wife of an addict
View the Video BOOK Trailer: http://sbprabooks.com/amandaandruzzi/video/

Holly
5:29 am December 27th, 2015

I am so glad that I have found this blog! My husband has been my best friend and my only love for ten years married and five dating. He has addiction with opiates and alcohol. It started 6 years ago and he has lied and manipulated me since then. I love him so much and so do my boys. He was sober for almost 2 years and then we started to grow apart and I had a gut feeling and I came home one day from him losing his job to him being drunk and high on pills. He promised to get help and I told him it was over. He detoxed and went to rehab for thirty days and he left a month in advance, bc he was going tondo 60 days. He now has so much anger towards me and while he was in rehab I was strong and I was ok with my choice. He was nice in rehab and loving, now that he is out he will barely talk to me and tells me I did this and he owes me nothing. I’m now experiencing pain like I never knew was possible. I feel so bad for my 2 boys bc they don’t deserve to be ignored bc of the pain that he feels when heciscaroumd them and I. I just wish I could be stronger and I had at least my best friend back. I am so alone and depressed and I feel like I’m losing grasp of things.

Lucy
3:12 pm January 18th, 2016

Hi.I’ve been with my fiancé for just over a year.I’ve given up everything to be with him.my family and sons have all left the country to go back to the UK. My beautiful fiance is a functional heroin addict and I’m at my wits end..I know he’s still using but he lies to my face..I love him so much but I feel in 2ND place in his life..I just don’t know what to do anymore..it’s tearing me up inside.

Amanda Andruzzi
4:18 pm February 8th, 2016

Holly and Lucy,
I apologize that it took so long for me to respond as I did not get notice of these posts.
I want to address both of you because unfortunately you are both with an addict and addicts are well known to lie, manipulate and do anything to make you feel that everything is your fault, even if they stop using. They use because they are not dealing with the root of their problem so anger and blame are part of the addiction. When you force an addict to get clean, this rarely works. When you create boundaries and then stick to those boundaries, they have no choice, they can leave or get sober but no in between. With addiction, you have to deal in facts, what you see, not what they tell you. Even in sobriety, if they are not really in recovery but clean, they still exhibit these behaviors because again, the drug was masking the real issues; mental illness, emotional issues, or both. You try to help them, they take you for everything you have and you fall apart. This is the cycle of co-addiction you are in. There is no way for this to change unless you get off the ride and change things. Please keep reading the other articles I have written here, click on Amanda Andruzzi and they will all come up. They are eye opening and can help you understand what is happening to you and how you can get out of this. The first step is knowing that you no longer want to go on this way.
Amanda Andruzzi, published author, Hope Street, a memoir from the wife of an addict View the Video BOOK Trailer: http://sbprabooks.com/amandaandruzzi/video/

johnleyo
2:15 am March 8th, 2016

Good article 😀

jody
11:07 pm April 8th, 2016

My 33 year old son and I live together. He has had a problem with drugs since he was 17. He is addicted to crack cocaine so every dollar he makes when he gets paid goes to the drug dealer. He doesn’t eat and I don’t know how he keeps going. He leaves for work at 5 am and sometimes don’t come home til 2am. he has done the drugs in our home. He was in prison 3 years ago and wS locked up almost 3 years because of a hit and run which resulted in death. I have been threatening him for over 2 mo if he don’t get help he gas to move. He keeps saying he wants help cause yes tired of what he’s been doing but he can’t quit his job or school. Although he just dropped his classes. he looks bad and I just lost my other son a year ago to alcolsm. I’m at my wits end. It is taken it’s toll on me. My son has told me he uses everyday. I nrw of at least every two. He tells me this when he’s been fighting to stay off the drugs for 2 days. He tells me to just keep his keys after ge gets home from work for a mo til he gets through this. I have feared if he owes money someone coming to our home. Any suggestions? I go to Celebrate recovery and hit alanon meetings once in as he
I think my sons problem has spiraled to fR. plz help

Amanda Andruzzi
4:17 pm April 12th, 2016

Jody,
I am so Sorry for the loss of your son. I can’t even imagine how hard that must be. To Lose two sons to addiction is just too much. She has been way past the point of out of control if he is been using for 15 years under your roof. You need to stop enabling his addictions and let him know that he needs to go into recovery for leave your home. Does work or school really matter when your son is addicted to crack and not eating, that’s stake. I would try an intervention with a specialist and if he does not agree to change his life from that moment be prepared to make him leave your home. He is just existing in the state and probably not for long, Allow him to hit rock bottom or make the choice to change his life. Please read my other article here, click on my name and there are many more articles here to help you deal with addiction in the family.
Andruzzi, published author, Hope Street, a memoir from the wife of an addict View the Video BOOK Trailer: http://sbprabooks.com/amandaandruzzi/video/

Jennifer
7:46 pm April 12th, 2016

Hi Amanda – I reached out a long time ago and the information you provided me with was very helpful. You guided me to your book, Hope Street, which was so amazing to read. I actually read it again for the second time, I felt like I needed it. After reading it again I took in a lot more information. I finally got up the courage to leave my husband and filed for divorce. It was hard for me to do, given the situation with his addiction, but I could not continue down his path, because it’s not my path and something that is beyond my control. Well, he was in a good place and we decided to give our relationship another try, unfortunately it did not work out and I told him we had to go our separate ways.

My concern now is that he will be moving back down to Florida so he can get back to where he feels comfortable and get himself healthy. He has been in and out of his daughters life since she was 2, she is now 4 and I don’t know what to tell her? For awhile now I have been telling her that daddy is sick, and she has hopes that when we are ready to move out of my moms house daddy will be coming to our new house when he is all better. She is an amazing little girl and is very happy, I just don’t know how to explain divorce and addiction to a 4 year old? My heart breaks when she talks about it because I just don’t know what to say?

Laura
6:00 am April 13th, 2016

I posted months ago and saw this again and wanted to update. After 4 1/2 years of being with my addict I am finally free!! I left him for good after he went to jail for yet another domestic. He was in jail less than two months but it was the time and distance I needed to move on. I feel differently about him and am no longer willing to wait for him to get clean and put myself and my family through more hell. I now have hope of finding happiness with someone someday who will treat me well. Before there was no hope at all.

Amanda Andruzzi
7:39 pm April 15th, 2016

Jennifer, Thanks for sharing. You know I understand the feelings you have about your daughter and it is heartbreaking, even to this day it bothers me to know her dad is out there, not involved in her life at all. However, by letting her know daddy is sick and loves you in the best way he can is all you can do. I told this to my daughter and still do but quite honestly, she won’t remember him if he is not in her life. My daughter has little memory of her father but I never say bad things about him, just that he is sick and does not know how to be a good father. Children are resilient so I am here to tell you my dauther is almost 12 now and she is doing so well. ONE strong and reliable parent can pull it off. You are making the right decision. It is not your journey, you are on your road to a better path. Keep me posted.
Amanda Andruzzi, published author, Hope Street, a memoir from the wife of an addict View the Video BOOK Trailer: http://sbprabooks.com/amandaandruzzi/video/

Amanda Andruzzi
7:42 pm April 15th, 2016

Laura,
Thank you for sharing that. I am so excited that you were able to get that time and distance that we all need to get past the hump of leaving. It was a blessing for you and I know you are going to find a happiness that is going to free you. Keep working on yourself and your healing so you can keep moving forward. Keep me posted.
Amanda Andruzzi, published author, Hope Street, a memoir from the wife of an addict View the Video BOOK Trailer: http://sbprabooks.com/amandaandruzzi/video/

Jennifer
1:17 pm April 23rd, 2016

Amanda – Thank you thank you thank you….a million times thank you. I appreciate your kind words and you sharing your experience. I will definitely keep you posted. Also, I’m glad to hear that your daughter is doing well and love the advice you gave her. I don’t wish this on anyone, but it’s nice to know there are people out there who have gone through this and understand. Thanks again!!

Abina
1:24 am May 8th, 2016

Hi. I found drugs in my husband jacket, when I questioned him , he denied that it was he’s, or don’t know how it got there , so I left it go…but kept my eye on him. Now I keep finding white powder stuff in he’s jacket pocket.. He’s distant , get angry.. I ask him to get help, he’s saying he’s not taking drugs. Now I asked him to leave, and I told him if he doesn’t, I will ring he’s job and tell them.. I know for certain he is using drugs.. How long , I don’t know.. What should I do .

Inge
7:32 pm May 14th, 2016

This is exactly how I feel. I am 22 and my boyfriend is 23. When I met him I was so vulnerable, I just wanted someone to love me. I am a very insecure person, people say I am quite attractive but I don’t believe it. He was captivated by me when we first met and I loved the fact that he didn’t care what people thought of him, he spoke to everyone and was not shy at all. I knew he did drugs but I thought it was occasionally, I should of run then. But he would constantly be high and when he was high his personality changes and he gets so aggressive. I am studying pharmacy and I have a very good scholarship so I have enough money, he is a waitor and recently does nothing and only depends on me. The fights, the sleepless nights waiting for him to come back from a party where he usually pisses himself, him having no respect and shouting at my parents, spending so much of my money, being aggresive, having no respect for my body, the insults, the worthless that I feel. I can’t do this anymore, I am going to lose myself. But I am so scared to leave him!! What if he changes his act and it was my fault for not waiting long enough and having faith in him and he meets someone else and treats her right, what if he does something stupid when I leave him, what if I go into a deep depression after the breakup, what if I can’t cope without him, what if I am the reason he is not getting his act together, what if I am the problem and that is why he gets so aggresive. I don’t know how to leave him. I don’t think I have it in me but I also feel that a part of me can’t sit and watch him destroy me. Please help.

Amanda Andruzzi
3:10 pm May 16th, 2016

Abina,
You can tell him that you know the truth regardless of what he tells you. You need to set boundaries right now, he either goes into recovery/rehab or he needs to leave. You have to be prepared and strong to follow through with these boundaries or he will know he has a revolving door. Have you read Hope Street? I tried to believe my ex-husband for 12 years but I should have listened to my gut. Addicts lie and manipulate so well that you start to question what you see right in front of you. Do not second guess yourself, ask him to get help or leave. It is his decision.
Amanda Andruzzi, published author, Hope Street, a memoir from the wife of an addict View the Video BOOK Trailer: http://sbprabooks.com/amandaandruzzi/video/

Amanda Andruzzi
1:58 am June 10th, 2016

Inge,
I am sorry your post slipped past me. If you read my book Hope Street, you will understand that I was you and in the same situation. I was smart but insecure and I fell in love with someone who said they would do anything for me. HE SAID it but rarely did it. He mostly snuck around getting high behind my back or what I learned later was in front of my face and I did not know. I can promise you that you need to leave, now, righ away. I wish I could have seen the future but all of those fears you have I talk about in my articles and in my book. There is nothing worse than what you are going through now and there are men out there who will love and respect you. This guy will use you as long as you make it easy for him to use drugs. You don’t leave so he knows he has no boundaries. If he stops using it won’t be because of you. I thought that for years and I can assure you my ex is still using, has been in relationships that I am sure if I was aware of I could have warned the poor girl but I let it go. When I left, he was no longer my problem, my focus was on me and our daughter and that was the best place for it. You need support, therapy and talk to people you trust so you don’t hide this anymore or it will kill you.

Amanda Andruzzi, published author, Hope Street, a memoir from the wife of an addict View the Video BOOK Trailer: http://sbprabooks.com/amandaandruzzi/video/

Leave a Reply

About Amanda Andruzzi

Amanda Andruzzi, MPH, AADP, CHES, is a Certified Health Coach, founder of Symptom-Free Wellness, and the author of Hope Street. Her first book, Hope Street memoir is an inspirational story of one woman's frightening journey of co-addiction that led her to uncover courage, unbelievable strength and overcome great adversity. She resides with her daughter, husband, and two sons in Florida.

Trusted Helpline
Help Available 24/7
1-888-882-1456
PRIVACY
GUARANTEED